Law Related Education Lending Library Resources

The Law Related Education Lending Library Resources Programs:

Article
"Sure-Fire Presentations” Published by the American Bar Association, 1993 The purpose of this article is to give lawyers who are planning to work with students some practical suggestions that will make their presentations more effective. Many of the suggestions have come from classroom teachers who have had extensive experience working with lawyers in the schools.

Article
"Vigilant Neighbors or Big Brother Informants?”(Terrorism) Published by the American Bar Association, 2000 This article features information about the TIPS program, a national system for concerned Americans to report suspicious activity that could be related to terrorism. Advantages and disadvantages of the program are discussed.

Journal
GP Solo, American Bar Association, October/November, 2002, Vol. 19, No.7 This journal includes an article entitled, “Tolerance Through Education” which discusses the importance of educating students about accepting individual differences. Recommendations and strategies for achieving this goal are discussed. Teachers of any grade can use the information provided to teach about these topics.

Journal
Guide to the BJS (Bureau of Justice Statistics) Website, Third Edition, December, 2002 This Journal is used as a notification of updates to the material that is available on their website at (http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/). It includes data on crime and justice; and lists a variety of criminal offenses from the fifty states. Included are national homicide trends, drug and crime facts, court and sentencing trends, and correctional populations for any given year. The information available in this resource would be most appropriate for use in an upper, high school classroom or college, criminology/law class.

Journal
Judicature, January/February, 2003, Vol. 86, No. 4 Articles in this journal include information on juror performance and how their work can be aided through note taking and pre-instruction methods. This resource may be relevant to students in upper, middle school or high school who are interested in taking part in a youth court program or mock trial competition.

Journal
National Bar Association, (Brown vs. Board) March/April 2004, Vol. 16, No.1 This magazine includes in-depth articles on Brown v. Board of Education. The articles examine the case’s impact on American education and culture with a focus on the legal issues related to equal opportunities in education. Elsie Boddie, author of the article ‘Reclaiming the Promise of Brown, Saying No to Vouchers” writes, “The education program monitors and aggressively engages in issues involving desegregation, school privatization, vouchers, high state testing (HST) processes, tracking in education, and residential segregation. These are manifestations of segregation today”, (page20).

Journal
The Bar Examiner, August 2002, Vol. 71, No. 3 Included in this journal is an article entitled, “Practice-Based Standard Setting”. It discusses performance standards and passing scores as they specifically relate to bar examinations. It uses analogies to describe what is generally accepted as the “norm” and describes how these “norms” are determined by changes in standards. Although this article speaks specifically to law students and the bar, the information and ideas brought forth can be of great use to teachers of any grade, specifically those who administer annual standardized tests.

Journal
The Montana Lawyer The State Bar of Montana, October 2002, Vol. 28, No. 2 The cover of this journal reads, “Peer Mediation Comes to Montana Schools”. The article on this topic highlights a story of two middle school students who require peer mediation. The article includes information on some of the most appropriate models for using mediation and the strategic plans involved in their proper execution. The approaches include training teachers to better understand communication strategies and problem solving skills of their students. This resource also describes how attorneys can support dispute resolution and peer mediation programs by taking an active role in training teachers and peer mediators to be successful. This resource is most appropriate for use by middle school and high school teachers but could also be of use to elementary teachers as well.

Journal
The Philadelphia Lawyer, Vol. 66, No. 1 This resource includes articles on family law specifically in regard to single and same sex parenting. Included is an article on technology that provides legal resource websites. This journal could be useful to anyone interested in these topics.

Lesson
Justice for All, Law Day Planning Guide, 2002 In this lesson students investigate and analyze how legal services are provided for the poor in the United States. Through this activity students are able to identify when a person is entitled to a free lawyer, examine legal implications of providing free lawyers in certain types of cases, and draft a policy statement about when legal services should be provided for the disadvantaged. This lesson is appropriate for students in grades 9-12.

Lesson
Negotiation, Law Day Planning Guide 2002 This lesson helps students understand the causes of conflict and introduces them to ways of resolution. Students discuss options for conflict and practice negotiation skills. This lesson is written for students in grades 4-6.

Lesson
Separation of Powers, Law Day Planning Guide, 2003 This lesson uses an interactive approach involving role-playing and questions and answers to teach about the separation of powers. Through this activity students come to understand how laws are made, enforced, and applied. This lesson is written for students in grades 4-6 and is appropriate for a lawyer, judge, or government official to teach in the classroom.

Lesson
The Mediation Process in the Primary Grades, Law Day Planning Guide, 2002 Through this lesson students learn and practice the steps in mediation as an effective way to solve their daily problems or conflicts. This lesson is most appropriate for students in grades K-3.

Lesson
The Right to a Free Public Education? You Be the Judge!, Law Day Planning Guide, 2002 This lesson allows students to discuss whether all children in the United States, citizens and non-citizens, should be provided with a free public education. Through this activity students will analyze their rights provided to them under the Constitution. This lesson is appropriate for students in grades 10-12.

Lesson
Three Wishes Adapted from Primary Voice, Constitution Rights Foundation, Chicago, 2001 This lesson teaches about the importance of getting along as a group in order to effectively make decisions. As a part of this lesson students analyze ways to resolve conflict, make decisions and identify and evaluate ways to reach group goals. This lesson is for students in grades 2-5.

Lesson
What is Judicial Independence? Law Day Planning Guide, 2002 In this lesson students are asked to explore what judicial independence is and why it is important. Students are given a quick overview of the history of judicial independence and are then asked to look at some scenarios to determine which actions may violate it. A final exercise asks students to related judicial independence to the process of becoming a judge in three jurisdictions. This lesson is appropriate for students in grades 7-12.

Lesson
What Makes a Good Judge? (Balancing Judicial Independence and Judicial Accountability), Law Day Planning Guide, 2003 In this lesson students are asked to weigh the costs and benefits of two methods of selecting judges, namely the election merit selection, by participating in an exercise in which they define the qualities they find desirable in judges. This lesson is appropriate for students in grades 7-12.

Lesson
What Should Happen if Someone Breaks the Rules? Adapted from the Constitutional Rights Foundation Chicago, 1997, 2003 This lesson teaches good citizenship and is appropriate for children in the elementary grades.

Newsletter
Center Court Helping Courts Improve the Administration of Justice, Vol. 6, No. 1, Winter 2003 There are a variety of highlighted articles in this newsletter. Included is a discussion about a family violence workplace policy for the National Center for State Courts and the opportunities that technology offers to help improve this policy and court performance. Also included is the topic of hung juries as a possible flaw in the justice system.

Newsletter
Constitutional Rights Foundation Bill of Rights In Action, Vol. 20, No. 3, Summer 2004 This newsletter examines nation-building efforts by the United States. Highlights include the Marshall Plan, Vietnam, and a comparison of successful and unsuccessful strategies.

Newsletter
Law Matters Educating the Public About the Law, Winter 2003-2004 Highlights of this issue include an article on the 50th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. Information about the case and case precedent is discussed at length.

Newsletter
The Legal Circle Educating for Democracy, Constitutional Rights Foundation Chicago, Spring 2003 Articles in this newsletter include “Teaching Democracy Through an International Exchange” and “Educating for Democracy”. The first article discusses the positive effects of teachers from Chicago working in partnership with educators from the Czech Republic, Estonia and Uzbekistan to prepare students for their role as active and contributing citizens. The second article discusses one classroom in Chicago that has had the opportunity to practice citizenship through hands-on activities. This resource serves as an example of exercises that can be used in any classroom.

Newsletter
The Legal Circle Education for Democracy Constitutional Rights Foundation Chicago, Fall 2002 In this newsletter Illinois students in grades 5-8 are recognized for their outstanding efforts for taking part in a hands-on, discovery, learning program that prompts students to become actively involved in their communities. The Project Citizen text guides teachers and their students through the stages of identifying a problem, finding solutions, creating public policy to address the issue, and then creating a plan for change. This resource provides a model that could be used in any elementary or secondary classroom.

Newsletter
Signature National Constitution Center Newsletter, Fall 2002 A variety of topics related to the U.S. Constitution are discussed in this newsletter and an article entitled, “Remarks by Sandra Day O’Connor Associate Judge, Supreme Court of the United States” is included.

Newsletter
Signature National Constitution Center Newsletter, Spring 2003 In this newsletter the Scholar’s Column features George Washington. It discusses the difficulties he faced as our first president, with no precedent to follow in regard to leadership strategy and tactic. This would be a good resource for students and teachers of an upper high school history class.

Pamphlets
Several pamphlets have been prepared as a public service by the Rhode Island Bar Association Committee on Public Relations. They contain general information on a variety of topics but are not intended to provide legal advice. The following titles are available: “A Clients’ Statement of Rights and Responsibilities” “Adoption – How Can I Go About It?” “An Accident! What Should I Know?” “How Divorce Law Affects You” “How to Choose and Use A Lawyer” “Landlord/Tenant Act What Should I Know About It?” “Probate – What Should I Know About It?” “Serving On A Rhode Island Jury” “What Happens When Drunk Drivers Get Caught?” “What Happens When You Are Arrested?” ‘What Should I Know About Buying A Home?” “What Should I Know About Legal Fees?” “Why Do I Need A Will?”

Pamphlet
"Fall Institute for LRE” Sponsored by The Vermont Bar Association’s Center for Public Education, September 28, 2001 This pamphlet highlights workshops that were made available to registrants during 2001. The topics included search and seizure, free speech, and law and literature. This pamphlet provides a good example of future workshop ideas.

Pamphlet
“Tips for Smart Consumers Credit Card Rights”, from the Office of Attorney Bill Sorrell, September 2001 This pamphlet describes an individual’s credit card rights including how to correct billing errors, the procedure for resolving billing errors, the creditors’ responsibilities, and what to do while disputes are being resolved. This resource is most appropriate for upper high school students and adults.

Project
American Bar Association Young Lawyers Division, “We the Jury” The ABA Young Lawyers Division has conducted “We the Jury”, a project to educate high school students about one of the most valuable civic duties in which they can participate, jury service. The Texas Young Lawyers Association created the curriculum materials for the project, which include an 82-page curriculum guide, video, and promotional items.

Project
Brown V. Board of Education, American Bar Association, 2004 This project/planning guide provides historical background, student based questions, conversation starters and suggestions for participating in a dialogue on Brown v. Board of Education. Additional resources, lesson ideas, accompanying articles, and websites on the case are included. This project could be used in high school classrooms.

Project
Dialogue on Freedom Materials Presented by the Utah State Bar Association, 2002 and Talking about Freedom: The Freedom Forum This project provides information on freedom and what it means as the basis of democracy. It includes suggestions for involving children in the democratic process and gives suggestions for good citizenship. A list of books and movies that incorporate freedom as their theme are also included. With simple modifications and or extensions, this resource could be appropriate for students in all grade levels.

Project
Justice Rules Developed by Rhode Island Supreme Court Chief Justice Frank J. Williams and Staff, 2000 This curriculum includes law related lesson plans and activities that are specific to each and every grade level. The Justice Rules curriculum teaches about the law, the court system and fundamental constitutional rights. Topics and concepts for each grade are clearly defined in the programs’ rationale and curriculum summary. A copy of this resource can be found accompanying the hard copy of the project, which is located at the Rhode Island Bar Association headquarters.

Project
United States Civil Rights in Wartime: Inter Arma Silent Leges, Presented by the Rhode Island Bar Association, March 2002 This project focuses on the preservation of constitutional freedoms and civil rights. It provides historical perspectives on legal cases and Supreme Court decisions from the Civil War, World War I, and World War II. This educational program is appropriate for use in high school grades.

Project
“We the Jury”, American Bar Association Young Lawyers Division The ABA Young Lawyers Division has conducted “We the Jury”, a project to educate high school students about the importance of jury service. The Texas Young Lawyers Association created the curriculum materials for the project, which include an 82-page curriculum guide, video, and promotional items.

Project
“We the People…The Citizen and the Constitution”, The nationally acclaimed civic education program about the history and philosophy of the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights, funded by the U.S. Department of Education by act of Congress The primary goal of this project is to promote civic competence and responsibility among elementary and secondary students. This two-fold project consists of an instructional program designed to enhance students’ understanding of the institutions of American democracy and a culminating activity, which consists of a simulated congressional hearing in which students testify before a panel of judges and demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of important constitutional principles.

Project
“We the People…Project Citizen” A portfolio-based civic education project for middle school classes, presented by the Center for Civic Education and the National Conference of State Legislatures We the People…Project Citizen is a civic education program for middle school students that promotes competent and responsible participation in state and local government. As a class project, students work together to identify and study a public policy issue and develop an action plan for implementing their policy. The final product is a portfolio displaying each group’s work.

Project
Youth Court Program/Project, April 2004 This is a program in which youth are sentenced by their peers for minor, delinquent and status offenses. Materials for this project include a fact sheet, a newsletter highlighting the strategies for responding to truancy in youth courts, a sample set of program development goals, a national program directory resource guide, and a videotape entitled, “Getting the Most Out of the Deliberation Process”. This project would be most appropriate for use in upper, secondary grades.

Videotape
“Brown vs. Board of Education”, 2004 This videotape includes an introduction to the case, classroom discussion, and a history of Utah’s segregated past. Its running time is approximately 35 minutes. This resource is most appropriate for use in upper high school classrooms.

Videotape
“Inter Arma Silent Leges” Translated from Latin: (Amid the clash of Arms the law is silent) Developed by The Rhode Island Bar Association and Roger Williams University School of Law, March 2002 This videotape, also available in CD-Rom, features retired RI Supreme Court Chief Justice Joseph R. Weisberger’s personal and historical perspectives on relevant legal cases and United States Supreme Court decisions from the Civil War, World War I, and World War II. This resource includes a seven-page background document detailing the information provided.

Videotape
“Youth Courts Getting the Most of the Deliberation Process” Developed by The National Youth Court Center c/o American Probation Association, 2004 This videotape highlights the consequences of breaking the law with an emphasis on shoplifting, physical assaults and bullying. The video’s running time is approximately 40 minutes. This resource is most appropriate for use in upper high school classrooms.

Lesson
What Juries Should Hear and See, Law Day Planning Guide, 2005, This lesson requires middle school students to generate courtroom rules that help ensure a fair trial.

Lesson
Juries: Cornerstones of Democracy, Law Day Planning Guide, 2005 This lesson, intended for high school students, focuses on the antecedents to the modern-day jury system in the United States.

Article
"Electronic Surveillance Vital to National Security or Violation of Privacy? Published by the American Bar Association, 2000 This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the use of technology as it relates to criminal activity.

Article
"Litigating Nursing Home Cases in Georgia” (Elderly Legal Issues) by Laura W. Speed-Dalton and Douglas F. Aholt, Georgia Bar Journal, October 2002, Vol.8, No.2 This article covers some of the legal issues that affect caregivers of the elderly who need special assistance.

Article
"Pro Se Profusion: A Wake Up Call for Connecticut’s Lawyers” by Norman K. Jones, Connecticut Lawyer, October 2001 In this article it is recommended that pro se litigants receive greater assistance from the bar. It is suggested that lawyers support pro se litigants in court because citizen participation leads to a greater respect for the judicial system. Included are tables that list the statewide Pro Se Assistance Programs, their funding sources, and descriptions.

Booklet
Law As A Career and A Life in the Law Published by the American Bar Association, 1997 These booklets describe a lawyer’s role in society, discuss the availability of a variety of legal careers and examine and explain the choices and criteria that should be considered when selecting a law school. These resources would be useful for high school or college students interested in pursuing a legal career.

Book
ABA Blueprint for Improving the Civil Justice System, 1992 This book was written in an attempt to discuss the efforts of the American Bar Association to improve the Civil Justice System.

Book
Did Not! Did Too! Created by The Ohio Bar Foundation, 2002 This book was written to teach third graders about the law. It helps to explain divorce and custody proceedings, adoption proceedings, and covers topics such as being witness or victim in a criminal trial. It includes a glossary of terms and defines these age-appropriately. A curriculum guide is included.

Book
Ensuring Equal Justice Addressing Cultural and Linguistic Differences in the Courts of Massachusetts Published by the Massachusetts Bar Association, 1996 This book discusses how issues of diversity, specifically cultural and linguistic differences, can impede equal access to justice. This resource includes a self-training guide to cultural awareness and includes a list of language skills necessary for effective communication. Strategies for recognizing cultural and linguistic issues and profiles of ethnic communities are included.

Book
Justice in Jeopardy, ABA Report of the Commission on the 21st Century Judiciary, American Bar Association, 2003 This report discusses recent trends of the courts and the judiciary. It outlines recommendations to preserve the legitimacy of the judiciary and discusses ways to improve judicial selection. Ways to promote an independent, judicial branch that works effectively with all areas of government are also highlighted.

Book
Righting the Wrongs: A Legal Guide to Understanding, Addressing and Preventing Sexual Harassment in Schools Written by Deborah L. Brake, Verna L. Williams, National Women’s Law Center, 1998 This book is designed to help attorneys, advocates, educators and school administrators understand sexual harassment in schools. It focuses on harassment of students and the legal obligations placed on schools to address it.

Book
Street Law A Course in Practical Law, Sixth Edition, Leo Arbetman, M.Ed., JD. And Edward O”Brien, JD, 2000 This book provides curriculum that focuses on practical application of the law for high school students. Information, advice and classroom activities that deal with current law-related issues have been designed to help students overcome legal disputes. It covers topics such as citizen advocacy, the court system, methods for settling disputes, crimes against individuals and their property, juvenile justice, family law, and discrimination.

Journal
Bar Leader, American Bar Association, May/June 2003 One article in this journal entitled, “Not Just Child’s Play Bar Efforts Reach Out to Kids”, highlights efforts by the San Francisco and New York Bar Associations to get lawyers involved in classrooms to help disadvantaged children learn the importance of character building. Other articles in this journal describe how bar associations have helped schools observe the anniversary of September 11th by giving students a stronger appreciation of the United States’ political system. Lawyers and judges have volunteered to speak to students about the Bill of Rights, cultural diversity and democracy. Educators of any grade wishing to teach about these topics could use this resource. Additionally, it could serve as a model to be incorporated into future LRE programs.

Journal
Center for Civic Values, 2000-2001 Biennial Report This journal written by the New Mexico Bar Foundation highlights the events of their Mock Trial program and teaches students about the law and the legal system. This resource would be useful for high school teachers and their students who would like to participate in such a program.

Journal
Focus on Law Studies, Teaching About Law in the Liberal Arts, Fall 2002, Vol. XVIII, No.1 The issues covered in this resource include civic engagement on school campuses, campus profiles and programs, and the role government plays in such programs. This resource may be useful to college or law school students and professors.

Journal
Focus on Law Studies Teaching About Law in the Liberal Arts, Spring 2003, Vol. XVIII, No. 2 The specific topics covered in this resource include: Guns in American Culture, Guns and the Second Amendment, and The Brady Law. The information provided in this journal could be incorporated into lesson plans and is most appropriate for students in the upper, high school grades.

Journal
Focus on Law Studies Teaching About Law in the Liberal Arts, Spring 2004, Volume XIX, Number 2 Topics in this issue include specific examination of Brown vs. Board of Education, and it’s controversial impact on the current learning gap and standardized testing procedures.

Booklet
Know Your Rights Published by the ACLU of Georgia, 1996 This booklet describes the individual rights of citizens and policemen. Through the use of text and illustrations it explains the similarities and differences between the two. This resource would be most appropriate for use by students in high school and college.

Booklet
Legal Guide for Young Adults in Oklahoma, A joint project of the Daily Oklahoman and the Sunday Oklahoman This booklet seeks to inform individuals of the various rights and responsibilities that they acquire when they turn 18 years old. It serves as an attempt to answer basic questions in several areas of the law that might affect a young adult’s life on a day-to-day basis.

Booklet
Legal Guide for Young Adults in Rhode Island A Joint Project of the Rhode Island Bar Association and the Providence Journal-Bulletin Newspaper in Education Program This booklet provides general information about the law and highlights an individual’s rights upon turning 18 years old. Some of the specific topics that are covered in this resource include: general information about newly acquired rights and responsibilities as an adult, the differences between criminal charges (misdemeanors and felonies), driving and traffic accidents, employment issues, marriage and divorce, contracts, buying a car and landlord/tenant issues. Included in this booklet are a list of government and private agencies, which protect and enforce individual rights. The addresses and telephone numbers for these agencies are also included.

Booklet
On Your Own Your Legal Rights at 18 Published by the Vermont Bar Association, 2002 This booklet contains a general overview of an individual’s legal rights and responsibilities upon turning 18 years old and is most appropriate for high school seniors.

Booklet
Talking About Freedom a teacher’s guide to the First Amendment, Presented as a public service by: The Freedom ForumThis resource is a series of eight educational print ads for teenagers. Dealing with issues ranging from dress codes to censorship of school newspapers and from school prayer to parental warning labels on records and CDs, the ads examine the complex interplay of competing interests that the First Amendment helps balance. This teaching guide provides copies of each ad, suitable for student handouts or classroom display, ready to use exercises, discussion guides and suggestions for interdisciplinary activities.

Booklet
The Legal Facts of Life, Akron Bar Association, 1993 This resource highlights general information on a variety of topics including civic rights and responsibilities, consumer issues, criminal law, employment, civil lawsuits, and landlord/tenant rights. This booklet is intended to provide general information only and was not intended to provide actual legal advice.

Booklet
The United States Constitution Published by the American Bar Association, 2002 This booklet contains the United States Constitution and many interesting facts about the six founding fathers and the Supreme Court. Twenty landmark cases in Supreme Court history and the Supreme Court Justices are listed. Amendments to the Constitution including the Bill of Rights and the Declaration of Independence are also included.

Pamphlet
“I Signed the Constitution”, Presented by The National Constitution Center, 2003 This brochure summarizes information about annual events that celebrate the founding of our Constitution and provides great ideas for lessons on this topic. The information in this pamphlet could be modified or extended for use in any classroom.

Pamphlet
“Kids Rights A Guide to Key Legal Issues Affecting Youth in Rhode Island” Prepared by Rhode Island Office of Child Advocate, 2003 This pamphlet defines various legal terms and explains the different types of court hearings that are specific to children’s rights. Other topics that are covered include: DCYF care, schooling issues, sexual harassment, working and earning money, military registration requirements, the consequences of drinking and driving, and the legal requirements for marriage.

Pamphlet
“The Independent Institute Enlightening Ideas for Public Policy”, 2003 This is a pamphlet that features publications and books on a variety of law related topics. Availability and order information is included.

Lesson
People Who Make Courts Work/Due Process Freedoms, Law Day Planning Guide, 2003 In this lesson students are given a situation in which a person is accused of committing a crime. They are then asked to identify the various types of people whose jobs in the courtroom ensure that due process occurs in determining the person’s guilt or innocence. This lesson is for students in grades K-3.

Newsletter
Law Matters Educating the Public About the Law, Summer 2004 This issue includes an article entitled, “Election 2004: Improving Voter Education Among Young Americans”. It is indicated in this article that young people vote far less than other Americans and then discusses the role that formal education can play in improving voter turnout. As indicated in this resource, there is a positive relationship between civics education and increased civic and political knowledge and involvement.

Newsletter
Mediation Matters – The Newsletter of the Community Mediation Center of Rhode Island, Vol. 3, Issue 2, Fall 2002 This resource includes articles about the Susan Welin Mediation Scholarship and information on basic mediation trainings.

Newsletter
Seniors and The Law A Guide for Maturing Californians, Funded by the Foundation of the State Bar of California, 2003 This newsletter includes a vast amount of information for senior citizens living in California. Specific information includes topics related to social security, reverse mortgages, tax relief, utility bills, travel and recreation, landlord tenant issues, health care benefits, living wills, disabilities and elder abuse. This resource would be beneficial to seniors or anyone looking to compare and contrast relevant state laws. This newsletter is also available in Spanish.

Newsletter
The Independent – Newsletter of the Independent Institute, Volume XII, Number 2, 2002 This newsletter includes articles on terrorism and forums that have recently been developed to combat it.

Newsletter
The Legal Circle Educating for Democracy, Constitutional Rights Foundation Chicago, Fall 2004 This issue includes special lessons on voting and the 2004 Presidential election. Lesson topics include who typically votes and how individuals can learn to think critically and act responsibly.

Newsletter
The Legal Circle Educating for Democracy, Constitutional Rights Foundation Chicago, Fall 2003 This newsletter includes lesson plans for teaching about the consequences of breaking rules and the law. These lessons with simple modifications and or extensions can be used in any classroom.

How to Contact:


Rhode Island Bar Association LRE Programs
Law Related Education Lending Library Resources
Rhode Island Legal/Educational Partnership, Inc. (RILEP)
Street Law
The Courtroom Information Project
Rhode Island Career Resource Network
Southern Rhode Island Collaborative